Franchisors Financially Helping Franchisees: A few thoughts

helpRecently, I posted a discussion on the International Franchise Association group on LinkedIn about the topic of “Franchisors Financially Helping Franchisees.” Surprisingly, there were only a few responses on such an important topic.

The first responder stated, “…considering the economic conditions we’re dealing with. I’m interested in hearing what others are doing in this area.” I agreed and stated, “I just hope the franchise industry doesn’t put it’s head in the sand and expect things to be status quo. As I’ve mentioned in one of my blog posts, putting one’s head in the sand leaves a very important ass-et vulnerable for all the world to take advantage of. Not a pretty site!”

Anyway, I thank the franchise professionals that did share their thoughts. Every little bit helps in our dedication to franchise success at all levels.

A Director of Franchise Relations at a national franchise concept wrote: “We feel it is important to do what is within our means to help our franchisees succeed. After all, isn’t their success our success? We have waived royalties for franchisees that have experienced a slower ramp up, provided they are doing everything called for within our system.”

A Director of Franchise Development at a national franchise concept added: “We put a ton of resources behind the support we offer our franchisees both at the initial launch stage, and on an on-going basis. As such, we’ve viewed royalty waivers or reductions as methods that may help reduce some bleeding, but not as a means to turn things around. We would rather focus additional resources on local marketing and sales driving efforts designed to build sales and the franchisee onto solid footing. Cutting royalties only address on part of the problem without really getting to what may be the cause of the lower than expected performance in the first place. [Landlords] that indicate they want to see a franchisor reduce royalties as a condition of offering rent relief may not be aware of the investment already being made by the franchisor to help build sales. Ultimately, in our business, it is the ]landlord] that needs to live up to their end of the bargain in bringing traffic to the centers where our franchisees operate.”

And, the President of a business development organization rounded out the discussion by stating: “I think the decision to help and how to help is very complex. The franchisor has a lot to lose when a franchisee fails but not every franchisee will survive the current economic climate. If the franchisee is truly following the book, is capitalized as required, is willing to listen and not resist/mistrust the efforts of the franchisor, I believe the franchisor has an obligation to go well beyond what they might otherwise do. Sit down, assess the situation, formulate a mutually beneficial plan, get to work. A franchisor must never forget that the best and cheapest PR comes from its franchise system and that it cuts both ways!”


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About Paul Segreto

Entrepreneur, Franchising & Small Business Professional, Top 100 Champion Small Business Influencer Awards 2014 & 2015, Popular Blogger & Podcaster
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One Response to Franchisors Financially Helping Franchisees: A few thoughts

  1. I would like to post a compliment to a number of U.S and Canadian Franchisors who are really pulling the stops out to further their franchise development in european markets.I cannot mention names, but there is a growing sense of ‘doing what it takes to get the deal done’ I have seen much more realisation that the applicant is not going to sign the dotted line without tangible concessions, or added value. I have also seen recently a growing trend to partner a franchise deal between Zee and Zor.This financial commitment is a testament to the quality of thinking between the Zee and Zor and I find it admirable that all parties are thinking outside the box to conclude deals.After all,confident brands should be confident of their business model shouldnt they?

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