Organizational Skills All Franchisees Should Possess

Organizational skillsWho hasn’t seen the phrase “organizational skills” listed as a requirement of a position? It might seem excessive that this vague term is so in demand, but the possession of organizational skills can make or break your career success.

While this is true for any role, it is even more integral for a franchise owner. Because there are so many tasks to juggle on any given day, keeping everything organized is the best way to ensure you’re getting the most out of your working hours.

Read on for a look at the essential organizational skills to propel your franchise location toward success:

Scheduling. More than just scheduling shifts and meetings, as a franchisee you’ll be expected to schedule every aspect that goes into running your business. From scheduling progress check-ins for projects to scheduling incentive programs for sales goals, the ability to create a schedule and stick to it is essential to running your franchise.

Delegation. It’s impossible for one person to handle everything that needs to happen to keep a business running smoothly—that’s why delegation is key. By delegating, you’re lightening the load on your own shoulders while empowering your team to tackle the difficult tasks.

Time Management. In many jobs, your time is managed for you. You’re provided with small goals on the way to larger accomplishments and project timelines are completed at your own manager’s discretion. However, as a franchisee, those project timelines and daily tasks are set by you.

People Management. Managing is commonly regarded as a “people skill,” but it takes organizational savvy as well. Planning evaluations, building a successful team and orchestrating group meetings may not be the leadership tasks that get all the attention, but they’re just as integral to being a respected and regarded manager.

Preparation. Being prepared is the key to staying on top of your business routine. Whether it’s taking notes before a meeting with your franchisor or jotting down the next to-do list at the end of the day, starting off on the right foot will keep you from playing catch-up when you should be looking ahead.

If you’re interested in the world of franchising, Franchise Foundry is the best place to turn!

Entrepreneurial Mindset: Consultant’s Friend or Foe?

failureSometimes, no matter what you do, no matter what you try, it just doesn’t work, or work to the level it needs to in order to help turn around a failing business. Not all consulting opportunities leave us smiling even though we gave it our all… and then some.

It’s sad, but we must learn from the experience to be better, even just a little bit better for the next time, for the next person, the next client, the next entrepreneur.

Certainly, we must be better for the next opportunity if we are to make a difference. In the end, we must not second guess. Instead, reflect upon the experience and move forward. It does leave me with a question, Does having an entrepreneur’s mindset help or actually hinder being an effective consultant?

#reflection #entrepreneurship

Opinion: A Case Against $15/Hour Minimum Wage

Personally, I’m of the mindset that if you’re not satisfied with the pay you’re receiving, maybe it’s time to look for another job or do what’s necessary to position yourself for a better paying job. I know, as I worked two jobs early on in my career because I had a family to feed and I just did what I had to do to provide. I cannot agree that it is the responsibility of business owners to just arbitrarily increase wages because hourly workers want or think they deserve more pay.

WageAlternatively, like business owners have done, these workers should look to small business ownership themselves if they want to make more money. Maybe join forces with others and form partnerships to take the first step.

And, a question that I haven’t seen answered is how a raise in pay to $15 per hour affects those already earning $15 per hour. So, if someone’s pay is raised from $10 to $15, does that mean the worker earning $15 should be bumped to $22.50 or higher? Where does it stop?

In the end, this movement will cost jobs and shutter once successful businesses. This is the land of freedom. In part, that means individuals are free to accept or decline job offers and on the flip side, business owners should be free to offer jobs to whomever they believe is qualified for an open position and at the wage believed to make economical sense for the business, including the owner’s return on investment provided of course, it’s above federally mandated minimum wage. Clearly, unions don’t see it this way and ultimately, they’re truly only looking to add to their own coffers. To them, it really is not for the betterment of workers as much it is to strengthen the unions and its leadership.

Paul Segreto, CEO, Franchise Foundry

What does a $15 minimum wage do to the economy? Economists are starting to find out.