Exploring Franchise Opportunities? Help is Closer Than You Might Think!

Great discussion this morning on Franchising & You podcast with Award-winning Franchise Developer, Holly A Ford. Holly shared her 4-step process of working with a franchise broker to explore franchise opportunities: 

  • Establish Business Outcomes 
  • Synchronize Outcomes with Opportunities 
  • Select and Validate Execute

She also shared her four recommended industry segments relating the same to The Fab Four (The Beatles), one of the most influential musical groups of our time. Thank you, Holly!!

Read Holly’s Fab Four blog post HERE.

Listen to today’s segment HERE

Franchise Sales: A Tale of Two Theories

franchise_salesA couple of years ago, there was a discussion in the Franchise Executives group on LinkedIn with the posted question, “Who is using outside franchise sales groups [brokers]?”

Below are some interesting responses from group members that are not franchise consultants or brokers:

An experienced franchise executive stated:
“Why wouldn’t you develop your own small sales group? Using a service that sells multiple franchises diminishes your quality control to some degree. I have been a part of 2 franchisors for 25 years and neither has ever used any of these groups and we have had lots of success. What are you trying to achieve by using these”groups”? Lower cost of acquisition, less hassle, expecting more leads, more foot soliders?”

The president of a national franchise concept wrote:
“We do not work with an outside group. In talking with our prospects it seems important to them to know that our development staff are part of the company and experts on the concept they are selling. We even have a dedicated sales team for each concept. My advice is to talk with some of your new franchisees to see if it would have made a difference in their decision making process.”

A franchise attorney posted his response:
“…if you use an outside broker in the true “sales” role, they can lose credibility if they appear detached and not knowledgeable about what they’re selling (often happens when your brand is only one of many in the broker’s portfolio). That should factor into your due diligence process when you’re looking at outside brokers. But when the relationship stays between the franchisee and the sales person, the prospect’s going to be let down when that sale is done and the sales person is on to the next prospect. Besides, I always wanted my sales person’s relationship with the prospect to taper off once the sale was done – the franchisee’s relationship should be with someone on the development then someone on the operations team. Two points – first, I always caution my clients to use brokers more as “matchmakers” rather than “salesmen.” What should really “sell” the franchise is not the sales person (internal or external) or the broker, but the confidence that the prospect has in the brand and in the ability of the management team; and, second, if my clients use outside sales people, I always make sure the outside sales team attend the same training I give my client’s internal team and do so at the same time. That way the outside sales folks get entrenched into the company’s culture, they know what to expect from management, they see how to use management to “sell” the franchise, and they know what management expects of them.”

A Vice President of a national franchise concept went on to write:
“For a variety of reasons I’m personally a big believer in building sales teams from within the company. But then again I’ve had the luxury of working for established franchisors and had resources to either develop salespeople from within the company, or rely on referrals to hire from outside and train them to become franchise salespeople. Both methods take time – generally about 12 months for a franchise salesperson to really “hit their stride”. Many franchisors don’t want to wait that long, or can’t wait that long, or don’t know how to train franchise salespeople. In those situations it may make sense to bring on outside franchise sales groups.”

So, that’s what franchise professionals were saying a couple of years ago… but what about today? Please, let us know your thoughts!

Are You a Franchise Seller?

On the surface, it doesn’t appear to be too difficult to determine whether or not one is a franchise seller. Yet, I hear time and time again the same rationalization and justification as to why a person feels they are not a franchise seller. I hear about trading off the candidate prior to the sale, only qualifying the candidate until the franchise salesperson actually talks turkey with the candidate, and just recently, I was told, about presenting the candidate with three options but the candidate is not sold anything. Does anyone REALLY believe this crap?

So, to eliminate the confusion as to what being a franchise seller entails, I refer back to The Franchise Seller’s Handbook by Warren Lee Lewis. Here’s what Warren has written in this fine publication, right in the first section, Introduction: Making Legal Franchise Sales

A Franchise Seller

If you are an officer, employee, representative or broker involved in the offer or sales of franchises, you are a “franchise seller.” As a franchise seller, you can use [the handbook] to help you make legal sales.

Your involvement in the offer or sale of franchises may be obvious, such as if you are a salesperson actively pursuing franchise prospects for a franchisor, are signing agreements with new franchisees, or are accepting payments from new franchisees. Or, your involvement may be less obvious, such as if you are participating as a finder or consultant in discussions with prospects about their business interests, pre-screening prospects through questionnaires, recommending franchise options, or assisting prospects in completing franchise application forms. In either case, you are involved in the offer and sale of franchises, making you a franchise seller.

Still confused? Well, I highly recommend you print a copy of The Franchise Seller’s Handbook by clicking HERE. And, be sure to read it sooner, rather than later. If you’d like a hard copy, just let me know and I’ll be sure to get you one. Of course, as supplies last!

This post was originally published on this site July 2010, but still relevant today with minor revisions made to the original post.


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